"implosions"

Stephan Micus - Implosions (1977)  Music

Posted by Designol at March 14, 2017
Stephan Micus - Implosions (1977)

Stephan Micus - Implosions (1977)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 201 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 109 Mb | Scans included | Time: 00:43:40
Neo-Classical, Minimal, Ethnic Fusion, New Age | Japo/ECM | # JAPO 60017, ECM 829 201-2

An ethereal, primordial Experience. Implosions is a state of consciousness that wraps you in the arms of swirling air, transports you to ethnic lands, where spices catch your pallet. Where stories are swapped and legends of old are discovered again. Stephan Micus takes you down the river Ganges as he plays from the sitar, you are in a languished state of being. His ethnic chants suffocate you until you are spirit removed from flesh. The mist begins to fall and as the fog rolls in you are swept into the remotest parts of the world, where things thought to have been lost or abandoned have been uncovered. Caravans from the east are swept into a mirage in the horizon, while strange red stone pillars stab at the sky. Then you come across the foothills of machu picchu, incensed by its abandonment you climb to the summit there an elder of a race long since vanished gives you knowledge of the new world. You stumble back into reality, Unable to return.
Nuclear Implosions: The Rise and Fall of the Washington Public Power Supply System (repost)

Nuclear Implosions: The Rise and Fall of the Washington Public Power Supply System by Daniel Pope
English | 2008 | ISBN: 0521179742, 0521402530 | 302 pages | PDF | 2,1 MB

Nuclear Implosions tells the story of a state government agency's failed attempt in the 1970s to build five large nuclear power stations in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Facing huge cost overruns and long construction delays, the agency completed only one plant and found itself unable to repay a $2.25 billion of municipal bonds.
Nuclear Implosions: The Rise and Fall of the Washington Public Power Supply System (Repost)

Daniel Pope, "Nuclear Implosions: The Rise and Fall of the Washington Public Power Supply System"
English | 2011 | ISBN: 0521179742 | 302 pages | PDF | 3 MB

Nuclear Implosions tells the story of a state government agency's failed attempt in the 1970s to build five large nuclear power stations in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Facing huge cost overruns and long construction delays, the agency completed only one plant and found itself unable to repay a $2.25 billion of municipal bonds.
Nuclear Implosions: The Rise and Fall of the Washington Public Power Supply System (Repost)

Daniel Pope, "Nuclear Implosions: The Rise and Fall of the Washington Public Power Supply System"
English | 2011 | ISBN: 0521179742, 0521402530 | 302 pages | PDF | 3 MB
Nuclear Implosions: The Rise and Fall of the Washington Public Power Supply System

Daniel Pope, "Nuclear Implosions: The Rise and Fall of the Washington Public Power Supply System"
C,.dge U-ty Press | 2011 | ISBN: 0521179742, 0521402530 | 302 pages | PDF | 2,1 MB
Stephan Micus 1977-78. Implosions - Koan - Behind Eleven Deserts

Stephan Micus 1977-78. Implosions - Koan - Behind Eleven Deserts
EAC FLACs cues | Booklets | 211 MB + 209 MB + 197 MB

Stephan Micus - Implosions 1977  Music

Posted by micaus11 at Nov. 14, 2008
Stephan Micus - Implosions   1977

Stephan Micus - Implosions 1977
MP3 @ 320 | 106 MB | Covers included | Repost
Genre: Jazz / World / ….

This truly is a desert island disc to this contributor. It has been held a special place since I first heard it many years ago. One of an amazing collection of albums by the enigmatic Micus. Unless you have heard him before, I can assure you that you have heard nothing like this before, mainly because his music comes from another place, literally. Micus is a master of an ever increasing range of world instruments that he uses, not to play the music of the instruments origin, but rather to create something totally new. For example, the instrument he plays on the cover is a sho, a Japanese mouth pipe organ. The sounds he makes from it are truly modern.
Micus plays all the instruments, as he always does and overdubs to create his sonic pieces. He has been a long time artist for ECM Records, so the recording and production are second to none. The centerpiece of this album is "As I Crossed The Bridge Of Dreams" and what a centerpiece it is. A long instrumental (all vocals are wordless things of beauty) which slowly builds to a beautiful climax and finale. I cannot recommend this album too highly, it is an important and magnificent. Just listen.

Stephan Micus - Desert Poems (2001) [Re-Up]  Music

Posted by Designol at July 11, 2017
Stephan Micus - Desert Poems (2001) [Re-Up]

Stephan Micus - Desert Poems (2001)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 217 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 125 Mb | Scans included
World Fusion, Neo-Classical | Label: ECM | # ECM 1757, 159 739-2 | 00:47:23

Desert Poems both consolidates and expands Stephan Micus's solo quest to fashion a music of archetypal, world-ranging import: music–often modal in nature–which would be both as old as the proverbial hills, yet as fresh as tomorrow. If you've followed this multi-instrumentalist's musical odyssey of the past 30-or-so years (this is something like his 15th solo project) you probably won't need any encouragement to buy an album that finds Micus's mastery of such instruments as the sarangi, nay, shakahuchi, steel drum and humble flower pot enhanced by a range of solo and polyphonic vocals. His pan-global sources are filtered to create a somewhat sombre, strongly devotional sense of the deeper rhythms of life to which music may awaken us. Apart from the vocalising on pieces like "Contessa Entellina", standout tracks include the solo shakuhachi feature "First Snow" and an instrumental reworking of "Shen Khar Venakhi", a masterpiece of old Georgian polyphony.

Stephan Micus - Darkness And Light (1990)  Music

Posted by Designol at June 15, 2017
Stephan Micus - Darkness And Light (1990)

Stephan Micus - Darkness And Light (1990)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 245 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 126 Mb | Scans included | 00:53:31
Neo-Classical, Minimalism, Ethnic Fusion, Jazz | Label: ECM | # ECM 1427, 847 272-2

German multi-instrumentalist Stephan Micus was making his own rather idiosyncratic version of world music years before it became fashionable to do so. Micus specializes in taking ethnic instruments from all over the planet and using them, in ways that transcend their traditional contexts, to play his own moody and somewhat austere compositions. On Darkness and Light Micus makes extensive use of the dilruba, a four-stringed bowed Indian instrument that sounds somewhat like a nasal cello which has 24 sympathetic strings that set up a hypnotic drone effect behind the haunting melodies. Also featured are the classical Spanish guitar, the Balinese suling flute, an Irish tin whistle, the sho (a Japanese bamboo mouth-organ), the kortholt (a German renaissance reed instrument), various gongs, and the remarkable ki un ki, a six-foot-long Siberian cane trumpet (pictured on the cover), whose spirited blasts are created by inhaling rather than exhaling.

Stephan Micus - Till The End Of Time (1978)  Music

Posted by Designol at March 26, 2017
Stephan Micus - Till The End Of Time (1978)

Stephan Micus - Till The End Of Time (1978)
EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 178 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 96 Mb | Scans included | 00:35:53
Neo-Classical, Minimal, Ethnic Fusion, New Age | Label: Japo/ECM | # JAPO 60026, 513 786-2

Before migrating across the ECM continent, Stephan Micus outfitted some of his most formative expeditions in the territories of the JAPO sub-label. On these albums one hears Micus at his most elemental, turning every gesture into inter-spatial awareness. The album’s duration of 36 minutes only serves to deepen its intimacy as a space in which the listener might catch a cushion of meditation in a world of splinters. Micus’s practice has always been to render the stem before the flower, and in the album’s title track a table harp provides that very illustrative function. Its dulcimer-like heart beats a rhythm at once ancient and fresh, curling as the scriptural page, its edges darkened from constant contact with the hands. Those same hands cradle a method of speech so musical that its melody is discernible only in the freedom of solitude.