Iván Fischer

Budapest Festival Orchestra, Iván Fischer - Mahler: Symphony No. 3 (2017) [Official Digital Download 24/192]

Budapest Festival Orchestra, Iván Fischer - Mahler: Symphony No. 3 (2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time - 95:45 minutes | 4.47 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet

I love the whole symphony but from the second movement two favorite moments, two details, spring to mind. First, the recapitulation when the solo violin takes flight, like a buzzing bee around a flower, and then accidentally finds itself in a wonderful modulation to E major. The second is the ending. The flowers, that move and dance elegantly against the wind, suddenly expose their Tristan-like soul. From the vast first movement I would choose the huge, yawning creature’s (Pan’s?) first appearance.
Budapest Festival Orchestra, Iván Fischer - Mahler: Symphony No. 3 (2017) [Official Digital Download 24/96]

Budapest Festival Orchestra, Iván Fischer - Mahler: Symphony No. 3 (2017)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/96 kHz | Time - 95:45 minutes | 1.85 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet

I love the whole symphony but from the second movement two favorite moments, two details, spring to mind. First, the recapitulation when the solo violin takes flight, like a buzzing bee around a flower, and then accidentally finds itself in a wonderful modulation to E major. The second is the ending. The flowers, that move and dance elegantly against the wind, suddenly expose their Tristan-like soul. From the vast first movement I would choose the huge, yawning creature’s (Pan’s?) first appearance. Conducting the Scherzo I am always carried away by the inserted episodes which interrupt the post horn – first by a group of baroque birds, then rococo ones flying up from the pages of a Mozart piano concerto. What an ingenious and unpredictable use of different styles! Finally, the endless melody of the last movement moves me every time with its intimate beauty and honesty. There is something divine in the wealth of this great masterpiece. Iván Fischer
Budapest Festival Orch, Iván Fischer - Brahms: Symphony No. 2 (2014) [Official Digital Download 24/192]

Budapest Festival Orch, Iván Fischer - Brahms: Symphony No. 2 (2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time - 68:20 minutes | 2.02 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet

Ivan Fischer’s follow up to his rapturously received recording of Brahms’ Symphony No.1 in 2009 – “monumental in every sense of the word…Outstanding.” as Andrew Clements in The Guardian put it.
Pieter Wispelwey, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Iván Fischer - Dvorak: Cello Concerto, Symphonic Variations (2007)

Pieter Wispelwey, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Iván Fischer - Dvorak: Cello Concerto, Symphonic Variations (2007)
EAC | FLAC (image+.cue, log) | Covers Included | 63:01 | 252 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: Channel Classics | Catalog: 25807

This fine recording of Dvorák's Cello Concerto by Dutch cellist Pieter Wispelwey with Hungarian conductor Iván Fischer leading the Budapest Festival Orchestra is as generous, honest, and compelling as the music itself. Wispelwey has a rich, ringing tone that can ride over orchestral tutti fortes yet still sound fully present in intimate pianissimos. He also has an elegant technique that can accomplish anything the work asks without calling undue attention to itself. These qualities allow him to lean into the work's powerful drama and aching lyricism without dividing his attention. The commanding Fischer leads the rich-toned Budapest Festival Orchestra in an accompaniment as musically interesting and dramatically significant as the solo part.
Gustav Mahler - Iván Fischer - Symphony No. 6 in a minor, 'Tragische' (2005) [Official Digital Download 24bit/192kHz]

Gustav Mahler - Symphony No. 6 in a minor, 'Tragische' (1904)
Budapest Festival Orchestra / Iván Fischer
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/192 kHz: 2,27 GB | NO Artwork | 5% Recovery Info
Label/Cat#: Channel Classics # CCS 2299 | Country/Year: Netherlands 2005
Genre: Classical | Style: Romantic, Early 20th Century

"However, in contrast to Abbado's boring Berliners, Fischer's orchestra plays better, and he's much better recorded. Just listen to the characterful brass in the coda of the first movement, with a particularly fine first trumpet, or the splendid woodwinds in the trios of the scherzo. (…) for a legitimate alternative viewpoint you will find it difficult to do better than this." ~classicstoday
Mozart - Die Zauberflöte (Iván Fischer, Dorothea Röschmann, Désirée Rancatore, Piotr Beczala) [2001]

Mozart - Die Zauberflote (Ivan Fischer, Dorothea Roschmann, Desiree Rancatore, Piotr Beczala) [2001]
NTSC 16:9 (720x480) VBR Auto Pan&Scan | Deutsch (LinearPCM, 2 ch), (Dolby AC3, 5 ch) | 7.79 Gb (DVD9)
Classical | Label: TDK | Sub: English, Deutsch, Francais, Espanol, Italiano | +3% Recovery | 158 min

Mozart’s final opera Die Zauberflöte is also his most famous. The general public is familiar with its array of popular arias, most notably the Queen of the Night’s breathtaking coloratura. Since its premiere in 1791, two months before the composer’s death, the opera’s fairy tale plot, eccentric cast and fantastic scenery have exerted an almost childlike fascination on generations of audiences. The production is infused with an all-pervading sense of playful joy – packed with wonderful effects including flying machines, colourful costumes and magical scene changes…

Mozart - Cosi fan tutte (Iván Fischer) [2007]  Music

Posted by Sowulo at Jan. 5, 2013
Mozart - Cosi fan tutte (Iván Fischer) [2007]

Mozart - Cosi fan tutte (Ivan Fischer) [2007]
NTSC 16:9 (720x480) VBR Auto Pan&Scan | Italiano (LinearPCM, 2 ch); (DTS, 5 ch) | 6.80 Gb+7.75 Gb (2*DVD9)
Classical | Label: Opus Arte | Sub: English, Francais, Deutsch, Espanol, Italiano | +3% Recovery | 138 min

We've had a "Summer of Love" Così with Ferrando sporting a Che Guevara t-shirt, and one set in "Despina's Diner" by the sea. This one, as staged at the Glyndebourne Festival during the summer of 2006, is comfortingly traditional. Comfortingly? A poor choice of words, because Così is never quite comforting (if you do it right!). Even if the sets and the costumes are strictly according to Hoyle, as they are here, Mozart's dramma giocosa should leave you feeling vaguely unsettled when the final curtain comes down. As conductor Iván Fischer reminds us during one of the bonus features here, almost everyone can be seduced…
Raymond Tuttle
Franz Liszt: A Faust Symphony - Budapest Festival Orchestra and Hungarian Radio Chorus; Iván Fischer

Franz Liszt: A Faust Symphony,S108 - Hans-Peter Blochwitz, tenor; Budapest Festival Orchestra; Hungarian Radio Chorus; Iván Fischer
Classical | 1 CD | EAC Rip V0.99 prebeta 4 | 278 Mb | FLAC+LOG+M3U+Cue | Scans included | 4shared links
Publisher: Philips

Ivan Fischer’s latest Budapest Festival bull’s-eye realizes the full breadth of Liszt’s vision, focusing to near-perfection Faust’s anguish (starting with the Allegro impetuoso at 2'28''), Gretchen’s tender modulations (try from 3'38'' on track 2) and the cynical thematic transformations that keep Mephistopheles alive and kicking. It is, above all, a profoundly authentic – or should I say authentically ‘lived’ – production, consistently animated (lightning shifts from piano to forte and back again are meticulously gauged), vividly recorded (note the tuba’s presence at 3'06'' into track 1) and with heavily scored tutti passages granted maximum impact…
For me, Fischer’s Faust Symphony is a clear front runner – more spontaneous than Rattle’s, more agile than Bernstein’s and better focused than Sinopoli’s.
Reviewed: Gramophone 4/1998
Budapest FO, Ivan Fischer - Zoltan Kodaly: Hary Janos Suite; Dances of Galanta & Marosszek; Children's Choruses (1999)

Zoltán Kodály: Háry János Suite; Dances of Galánta & Marosszék; Children's Choruses (1999)
Children's Choir Magnificat, Budapest; Children's Choir Miraculum, Kecskemét
Budapest Festival Orchestra, Iván Fischer, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 309 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 178 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Philips | # 462 824-2 | Time: 01:06:13

Coupling the Hary Janos Suite with Kodaly ’ s two highly contrasted sets of Hungarian dances, urban and rural, is a time - honoured gambit, but Fischer has had the birght idea of adding some of the composer ’ s children ’ s choruses, and instrumental movements from the seldom - heard Hary Janos Singspiel that was the ultimate source for the perennially popular suite, in order to give a broader picture of Kodaly, both as musician and musical humorist. On the whole it works well: the Singspiel extracts are very slight, but the choruses are highly characteristic – and flawlessly sung by superbly disciplined childrens ’ choirs trained, inevitably, in the ‘ Kodaly Method ’. Nevertheless the three principal orchestral works remain the point for buying the disc, and these are very vivid, exciting interpretations. Fischer comes up against stiff competition in Antal Dorati ’ s classic 1973 recording of Hary and the dance - suites with the Philharmonia Hungarica. Dorati is ‘ straighter ’ in his readings of the pieces than Fischer, and the playing packs a tremendous punch: he also adds the Peacock Variations as coupling, and thus probably still remains the first choice.
Budapest Festival Orch, Ivan Fischer - Brahms: Symphony No. 1 (2009) [Official Digital Download 24/192]

Budapest Festival Orch, Ivan Fischer - Brahms: Symphony No. 1 (2009)
FLAC (tracks) 24-bit/192 kHz | Time - 67:20 minutes | 2.75 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet

Brahms never made a secret of the inspiration he drew from the Beethoven symphonies, but before he published his first symphony - inspired by Beethoven's fifth and ninth - he had struggled for no less than fourteen years with it. In the meantime he wrote many more pieces and his Variations on a theme by Haydn are considered to be a preliminary exercise before venturing on to the first symphony. The opening piece of this recording, the Hungarian Dance No. 14, goes back to Brahms as a young cafe pianist, when he and his father earned a bit on the side in bars in the red-light district of Hamburg and where he first heard Hungarian gipsy music. It was this experience that gave birth to Brahms' lifelong attachment to and admiration for this rich folk music style.