Philip Glass

The Hague Philharmonic, Carolyn Kuan - Philip Glass - Life: A Journey Through Time (2017)

Philip Glass - Life: A Journey Through Time (2017)
The Hague Philharmonic, conducted by Carolyn Kuan

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 278 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 142 Mb | Scans included
Genre: Classical | Label: Orange Mountain | # OMM0116 | Time: 00:58:11

Orange Mountain is proud to announce the release of the world premiere recording of LIFE - A Journey Through Time with The Hague Philharmonic under the direction of Carolyn Kuan. Commissioned by the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music and conceived of by nature photographer Frans Lanting, LIFE: A Journey Through Time is a multimedia experience with images by Lanting and music by Philip Glass that showcases the wonders of the natural world. The hour-long score is cast in seven movements and was drawn from previously existing music in the Glass catalogue from a variety of sources, orchestrated for the first time by Michael Riesman. Since its premiere in 2006, LIFE has been performed dozens of times including in an abbreviated version, ORIGINS, at the inauguration of the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland for an audience of international dignitaries.
Robert McDuffie, Houston Symphony, Christoph Eschenbach - Violin Concertos of  John Adams & Philip Glass (1999)

Robert McDuffie, Houston Symphony, Christoph Eschenbach - Violin Concertos of John Adams & Philip Glass (1999)
EAC | APE (image+.cue, log) | Covers Included | 59:57 | 282 MB
Genre: Classical | Label: Telarc | Catalog: CD 80494

Leave it to Christoph Eschenbach and the Houston Symphony to deliver one of the more impressive classical discs of 1999: a pairing of the violin concertos of John Adams and Philip Glass. Hearing the works of these two American music mavericks side-by-side is a study in contrasts: Adams's postmodernist composition from 1993 is filled with spooky overtones, as the violin threads its way through the piece, always at the forefront.

Tim Fain - Philip Glass: Partita for Solo Violin (2015) [Re-Up]  Music

Posted by Designol at Aug. 15, 2017
Tim Fain - Philip Glass: Partita for Solo Violin (2015) [Re-Up]

Tim Fain plays Philip Glass: Partita for Solo Violin (2015)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 244 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 118 Mb | Scans included
Classical, Minimalism | Label: Orange Mountain Music | # 0050 | Time: 00:45:53

Violinist Tim Fain has worked extensively with minimalist composer Philip Glass in performances and in the preparation of new pieces, and the most impressive result of their collaboration may be the Partita for solo violin (2010), a seven-movement suite written especially for Fain. Associations with Johann Sebastian Bach's violin partitas are inevitable, and it's clear that Glass has had them in mind while composing in what can be described as an aspirational, rather than a merely imitative, manner. Glass has for the most part avoided his customary ostinatos and static sections, and his use of broken chords only suggests counterpoint, rather than propulsive rhythmic patterns. He has also eschewed any direct references to Bach or Baroque style, yet the Partita's kinship with the older models is certainly felt, and Fain's playing has a lot to do with it. The ebb and flow of tempos and the expressive use of rubato give the Partita an introspective feeling, and the freedom of individual expression is quite removed from the locked-in, high-energy ensemble playing that was Glass' early trademark style.
Fine Arts Quartet - Four American Quartets: Philip Glass, Bernard Herrmann, George Antheil, Ralph Evans (2008)

Fine Arts Quartet - Four American Quartets (2008)
Philip Glass - Bernard Herrmann - George Antheil - Ralph Evans

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 298 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 163 Mb | Scans included
Classical, Chamber | Label: Naxos | # 8.559354 | Time: 01:02:25

This recording gathers four string quartets by American composers who are widely divergent in style and manner, and who have made a distinctive and personal contribution to this endlessly re-inventive format. Ralph Evans is more familiar as a performer than composer. Finally completed in 1995, his First String Quartet is written in a non-derivative style, with tuneful melodies, lively counterpoint and piquant harmonies. Philip Glass has completed five mature quartets, his Second Quartet deriving from a theatrical presentation of Samuel Beckett’s prose poem Company. The self-styled ‘bad boy of American music’, George Antheil wrote three string quartets, the third of which is permeated by a folk-music ambience. Best remembered for his film scores, Bernard Herrmann had not released a concert work for 25 years when he wrote Echoes. Its title applies to the thematic connections unobtrusively linking the ten sections of this one-movement piece.
Kevin Bowyer - Philip Glass: Music for Organ; Christopher Bowers-Broadbent: Duets and Canons (2001)

Kevin Bowyer - Philip Glass & Christopher Bowers-Broadbent: Music for Organ (2001)
EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 357 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 168 Mb | Covers included
Classical, Minimalism, Contemporary | Label: Nimbus | # NI 5664 | 01:11:50

The organ music of Philip Glass presents some of his most significant and extended minimalist works. Dance 2 and Dance 4 are the two solo organ movements of a five-part work composed in the early 1970s. The arrangement of the Act III Finale to his opera Satyagraha dates from 1980 and is one of the most famous and familiar pieces in all Glass. The sheer accuracy and concentration of Kevin Bowyer's performances guarantee that this music is heard to its best effect on the splendid 1995 Marcussen organ at Tonbridge School.
MDR Leipzig RSO, Absolute Ensemble, Kristjan Jarvi - Philip Glass: Aguas da Amazonia (2017)

Philip Glass - Aguas da Amazonia (2017)
MDR Leipzig Radio Symphony Orchestra; Absolute Ensemble; Kristjan Järvi, conductor

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 279 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 140 Mb | Scans included
Classical, Minimalism | Label: Orange Mountain | # OMM0115 | Time: 00:51:26

Orange Mountain Music is proud to release the new album Aguas da Amazonia in a new orchestral version. In the 1990s Philip Glass composed a ballet for the Brazilian Grupo Corpo titled “Seven or Eight Pieces for a Ballet.” That music was picked up by the famous percussion group UAKTI and later recorded for the album Aguas da Amazonia. Aguas da Amazonia became the launching point and inspiration for arranger Charles Coleman who worked with conductor Kristjan Jarvi on adapting Glass’ music for large symphony orchestra. This new recording captures Coleman's orchestration in all its majesty showcasing the inherent symphonic possibilities.The performance showcases the MDR Leipzig Radio Symphony Orchestra under Kristjan Jarvi as well as the dynamic Absolute Ensemble.

Philip Glass - Solo Piano (1989)  Music

Posted by tirexiss at May 23, 2017
Philip Glass - Solo Piano (1989)

Philip Glass - Solo Piano (1989)
EAC | FLAC (image+.cue, log) | Covers Included | 51:25 | 187 MB
Genre: Classical, Minimalism | Label: CBS Records | Catalog: MK 45576

With SOLO PIANO, Glass presents himself "unplugged" - no electronic keyboards or synthesizers, and no overdubs, either - just solo piano. Here, Glass' connection to the established "classical" tradition is most evident. Though his pieces are "minimal" (subtly altered repeated patterns or melodic motifs), yet they have an unsentimental beauty and heartfelt grace that one would hear in J.S. Bach's English Suites, as well as the piano music of Chopin and Erik Satie.
Philip Glass - Koyaanisqatsi: Original Motion Picture Score (1983) Complete Original Soundtrack Version 2009 [Repost]

Philip Glass - Koyaanisqatsi: Original Motion Picture Score (1983)
Complete Original Soundtrack Version 2009

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 371 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 176 Mb | Artwork included
Soundtrack, Minimalism | Label: Orange Mountain Music | # OMM0058 | 01:16:22

Koyaanisqatsi is a contemporary masterpiece. The film has had a significant impact on the media arts, music and popular culture since its release in 1983. This version is the original soundtrack including the sound effects used in the film.

Philip Glass - A Descent into the Maelstrom (2002)  Music

Posted by Designol at May 15, 2017
Philip Glass - A Descent into the Maelstrom (2002)

Philip Glass - A Descent into the Maelström (2002)
The Philip Glass Ensemble; Michael Riesman, musical director

EAC | FLAC | Tracks (Cue&Log) ~ 383 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 152 Mb | Scans included
Minimalism, Modern Ballet | Label: Orange Mountain Music | # OMM 0005 | 01:05:09

In 1986 Mr. Glass was commissioned to create and bring a piece to the Adelaide Festival of Arts in Adelaide, Australia. He chose to write a piece based on the Edgar Allan Poe short story "A Descent into the Maelström" and invited collaborators dancer/choreographer Molissa Fenley, set designer Eamon D’Arcy and theatre director Mathew McGuire to participate. They transformed Edgar Allan Poe's vertiginous short story of being swept into a huge and terrible whirlpool by a raging hurricane that "the oldest seaman in Norway never experienced" into a Musical/Dance/Theatre extravganza. This compelling, propulsive piece of music premiered in March, 1986 at the Adelaide Festival of Arts and was only performed by the Philip Glass Ensemble during the week of the festival in Australia. Consequently, it has had very little exposure to Philip Glass' audience. This little known recording of this powerful piece of classic Glass music was made when the Philip Glass Ensemble was at one of its peaks. It was also done in possibly one of the best settings for Philip Glass and his musicians– musical theatre.
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus, Robert Shaw - Philip Glass: Itaipu; The Canyon (1993) [Repost]

Philip Glass: Itaipu; The Canyon (1993)
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus, conducted by Robert Shaw

EAC | FLAC | Image (Cue&Log) ~ 285 Mb | Mp3 (CBR320) ~ 187 Mb | Scans included
Classical, Minimalism, Choral | Label: Sony Classical | # SK 46352 | 00:55:52

Itaipu (1989) is something of a cantata-cum-symphony-cum-oratorio with no clear text. Its topic is the world's largest hydroelectric dam, built on the Rarana River between Paraguay and Brazil, and the piece–in Glass's trademark punctuating minimalism–is filled with distinct South American instrumentation, particularly in the percussion. The music itself is noble, conjuring the human endeavor to build the five-mile-wide dam near the town of Itaipu. The Canyon (1988) is about no canyon in particular but tonally suggests the mystery of canyons in general. Both these compositions are among Glass's better works.